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Thursday, April 15, 2021
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U.S. congressional hearing takes on anti-Asian violence two days after Georgia shootings

Lawmakers, professors and actor Daniel Dae Kim on Thursday (March 18) joined a U.S. congressional hearing on anti-Asian discrimination and violence, two days after the fatal shootings of six Asian women and two others in Georgia.

The hearing was scheduled before the attack to investigate a spike in hate crimes against Asian Americans, which rose by 149% in 2020 in 16 major cities compared with 2019, according to the Center for the Study of Hate and Extremism.

Experts have linked the surge to the COVID-19 pandemic, which originated in China, after some Americans, including former President Donald Trump, started calling the coronavirus the “China virus,” “the China plague” and the “kung flu.”

A 21-year-old white man has been charged with killing eight people, six of them Asian women, at three spas in the Atlanta area on Tuesday. Police are investigating motives and have not ruled out the possibility that the attacks were provoked, at least in part, by anti-immigrant or anti-Asian sentiments.

Demiocratic lawmaker Doris Matsui, who was born in an internment camp that held Americans of Japanese descent in World War II said “The heat of discourse at the highest levels of our government cannot be viewed in isolation from the ensuing violence in our communities.”

The spike in anti-Asian American incidents in the past year included people being slashed with a box cutter, lit on fire and verbal harassment, said Steve Cohen, the Democratic chair of the House of Representatives Judiciary Committee’s Subcommittee on the Constitution, Civil Rights and Civil Liberties.

Actor Daniel Dae Kim, best known for starring in the television series “Lost” and “Hawaii Five-0,” called on lawmakers to pass legislation to fund groups that provide counseling to victims of hate crimes and improve data collection for hate crime reporting.

“What happens right now and over the course of the coming months will send a message for generations to come as to whether we matter, as to whether the country we call home chooses to erase us or include us,” said Kim.

In the closely divided House, the hearing quickly lapsed into partisan politics, however.

In a sprawling opening speech, Republican lawmaker Chip Roy faced backlash from house colleagues after his remarks saying the subject matter was important, but then moved on to attacking China’s treatment of its Uighur community and handling of the coronavirus.

“This hearing was to address the hurt and pain of our community and to find solutions, and we will not let you take our voice from us,” Rep. Grace Meng said in an emotional response to Roy’s comments.

(Production: Kia Johnson)

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